Talk of Haggis – Edinburgh Part 2

I’ve spent most of the last week and a half looking after a sick husband, who’s cold gave into a call for antibiotics – which, I can’t stop myself from mentioning, too a whole 2 hours (yes, that’s right! TWO HOURS!!) to get out of the pharmacy five minutes up the street … but that’s an entirely different story right there …

For now, let’s talk about Haggis.

The ingredients of this traditional Scottish dish might make the vegetarians ans squeamish among you … well, squirm.

Sheep liver, heart and lung is combined with onions, oatmeal and various herbs and spices, before being stuffed into a cooked sheep’s stomach and boiled for about 3 hours.

Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

Traditionally served on Burn’s Night (a day in February which commemorates the famous Scottish poet Robert Burns) with “neeps and tatties” – mashed potatoes and sweed to us – Haggis is eaten all year round in Scotland.

Apparently it also makes up an essential part of a traditional Scottish cooked breakfast – being hungrily tucked into by my hubby, soon after he had given his 8:30am presentation at the conference! 😀

Whether or not this plate of Haggis, Black Pudding (blood pudding), sausage, bacon, beans, eggs and potato scone is genuinely a Scottish cooked breakfast, I’m not convinced about, as it was eaten in a Turkish greasy-spoon-cafe …

I didn’t consider myself equal to devouring  a plate of Big Meat Breakfast, so I had my haggis with some toast – yes, I really do like Haggis!! 😛 Cook it like a bugger, stuff it in a bread roll with cheese, ketchup and lettuce, don’t think about the ingredients and it’s amazing!! 😉

Two wonderful things about this cafe: they gave you proper big mugs of tea, instead of a couple of mouthfuls in a little cup and they spelled toast “toasts”! 🙂

For those of you are seriously beginning to doubt my good taste in food, presuming that you ever thought I had any in the first place! 😉 …

That very same evening we had the most amazing steak, chips and grilled tomatoes with fiery peppercorn sauce for L and mushroom sauce for me – It. Was. Delicious.

This restaurant was one of the best I can remember visiting – a wonderful atmosphere, beautiful flowers, warm candles, red walls, quirky cellar building, live piano music and the most discreet staff ever!

I find it rather intimidating when the servers are constantly coming up and asking how your meal was and if we need anything else to drink! They stand around watching you and fiddling with other table settings and I find it impossible to relax, get very self-conscious and feel pressurized to leave as soon as possible – like I’m inconveniencing them by staying any longer after my last bite is swallowed. As you can tell, I have quite an opinion on this! 😉

Ryan’s Bar wasn’t high-end dinning, or posh/formal, so there wasn’t an abundance of cutlery options, napkins laid on your knees by gloved waiters in tails (not the kind of establishment I’m in the habit of visiting by the way! :P), but on the other hand, we only ate there because we had a card which gave us two meals for the price of one!

The food was scrummy the wine was really tasty, but the service was truly outstanding!

They gave us a good while to read the menu and choose our drinks before asking what we wanted to order. They did ask which of us wanted to taste the wine (a custom in many English restaurants), but were relaxed enough to make a joke about it. They brought the meal promptly, only asked once if we liked the food, and the head waiter simply removed the empty wine bottle without comment as he kept walking past the table, so as not to interrupt our conversation – brilliant! I felt genuinely relaxed and they didn’t bring us the bill or come for payment until we asked, allowing us to stay and enjoy our time together and our wine without any pressure at all.

The live piano jazz was the perfect icing on a very yummy cake! 😉

If you find yourself in Edinburgh, visit the cellar restraint part of Ryan’s Bar. Go on – you can see how loquacious I’ve got about it!! 😉

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2 thoughts on “Talk of Haggis – Edinburgh Part 2

    • Even here in England there is lots of confusion over exactle what is a swede and what is a turnip … I believe in the US you call it a rutabaga? A turnip is small, white, green and a turnip os bigger, with purpleish skin and orange flesh. I’ll post a photo of one for you. Honestly, I don’t care for it very much at all, as it’s watery and a bit bitter! 😛

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